Skip to content
Header banner full
Header banner

The cultural regeneration seems to have played a role in reaching the new status of a city. In 2000, Newcastle councils and Gateshead formed a partnership to achieve the common goal of ensuring a cultural regeneration to promote the region as a tourist destination. Recently, in spite of the loss of the European cultural Competition Capital, its purpose is to promote the cultural agenda. Through many cultural projects, the city has access to a wide variety of people and experiences an increase in tourists (Rodrigo, 2016).

Figure 1 Quayside

As a student studying in Newcastle, I feel Newcastle is different from any other cities. It is a great city, full of culture and civic pride. Football culture and plenty of parties showed the enthusiasm of the local people. Newcastle is a fine city that deserves better than football tourists and hen parties. We can have an excellent walk along the Tyne River, stopping off in the bars or coffee houses along the way to enjoy the view over the river and visiting the Sunday market along the river. This also became a special culture of this amazing city.

Figure 2 Newcastle Sunday market

However, whether cultural development has caused the urban regeneration is a question that plenty of authors discuss. Could the cultural regeneration really change the image of Newcastle and attract more tourists? The new trend, involving a combination of culture and urban regeneration, is not only in Newcastle but also globally (Gibson & Stevenson 2004). Although no one can really answer the questions, I believe that culture is one important part of a city. Cultural regeneration is necessary and important for urban regeneration.

 

 

 

Sources of Images:

Figure 1 Photo taken by the author

Figure 2 From http://www.fotolibra.com/gallery/941356/newcastle-quayside-sunday-market/

 

Reference

Rodrigo. (2016). Urban Tourism: Regeneration Newcastle City – The WritePass Journal. [online] Available at: https://writepass.com/journal/2016/10/urban-tourism-regeneration-newcastle-city/ [Accessed 21 May 2018].

Gibson, L. and Stevenson, D., 2004. ‘Urban space and the uses of culture’. International Journal of Cultural Policy, 10 (1), 1-4

School of Architecture
Planning and Landscape
Newcastle upon Tyne
Tyne and Wear, NE1 7RU

Tel: 0191 208 6509

Email: nicola.rutherford@ncl.ac.uk


Hit Counter provided by recruiting services