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Micro flats are around 15 – 25 sqm in size, these can be stacked in huge numbers helping raise the density of an area. They include a full self-contained unit with a kitchen, bedroom and en-suite. Additionally, as micro flats are in apartment buildings, they include communal facilities, such as a library, lounge, cafes and restaurants. This helps create a small community within the block, resulting in better social connections and better accessibility to facilities at a short distance.

Micro flat in the Collective Old Oak – (1)

Who are they for?

They are mainly for people who are after a low-cost accommodation, this can generally be young professionals/graduates. There are some examples based within London and Vancouver, as some people are changing to live communally instead of a single dwelling. Although this idea may not be idea for some, it is worth seeing people’s response’s in these included videos (a) – London, (b) – Vancouver.

Micro flats are a result of the housing crisis and unaffordable units within city zones. It keep young single professionals within the city in more affordable accommodation. Micro flats are a response to the market by applying a new solution which has taken popularity, indicating there is a market for this type of living. It allows co-living where people can work in the same space, and stay in the city instead of being priced out and moving further outside the city (TheTelegraph, 2017).

Case study

Old Oak Collective in London is an apartment block housing 550 units, this is shown in the video link above. The residents are happy living there, and have all the amenities they want, including a cinema, gym and roof top spaces. Compared to other house prices in London, the Old Oak brings affordable options to people who want work within the city (PLPArchitecture, 2017).

The Collective Old Oak – (2)

The other key aspect of this case study is the use of co-living, houses today are separated giving each unit a large amount of private space. But social isolation and minimal social connections are a result of urban sprawls meaning communal maybe the solution. The Old Oak achieves this by placing a high number of people within a single building and providing the key facilities they want helping building stronger relationships whilst keeping to costs low.

References

PLPArchitecture (2017) The Collective Old Oak London, UK [Online] Available at: http://www.plparchitecture.com/the-collective-old-oak.html [Accessed 21st May 2018]

TheTelegraph (2017) Can micro-flats solve Britain’s housing crisis? [Online] Available at:  https://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/style/can-micro-flats-solve-britains-housing-crisis/ [Accessed 21st May 2018]

School of Architecture
Planning and Landscape
Newcastle upon Tyne
Tyne and Wear, NE1 7RU

Tel: 0191 208 6509

Email: nicola.rutherford@ncl.ac.uk


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